April 2014: Quicksand: Landscape of the Feminine: New Work by Anila Quayyum Agha

Agha's work includes collaged drawings and installations that explore how social and gender-based issues result from the concepts constructed by history, traditions, and contemporary society. The complicated social issues inherent in the history and production of fiber inspire her textile processes, in particular, embroidery. The addition of traditional drawing materials with dyes, wax, coffee or tea stains invoke the history and residual memory of the feminine and domestic, and add to the depth of meaning conveyed by the drawings. The use of embroidery as a drawing medium both interacts and bridges the gap between modern materials and the historical and traditional patterns of oppression and domestic servitude. This process results in artwork that is conceptually ambiguous, producing more complicated weaves of thought, artistic action, and social experience. 

Agha is a 2013 Arts Council of Indianapolis Creative Renewal Arts Fellow.

Learn more about Anila

 

March 2014: Stills: Recent Paintings by Phillip Lynam

Closing Reception and Artist Talk with Phillip Lynam: Thursday, March 27, 6-8pm

Lynam's new work seeks to explore the potential for a two-dimensional artwork to create an immersive, dislocating experience.  The artist describes his most powerful personal experience with artwork as the moment at which the viewer slows down, has effectively blocked out the rest of the room and any other distractions, the moment that one is not simply looking at the surface of a painting, but is looking into the work - completely immersed in the artwork itself. This experience is not dissimilar to the way one might interact with television screens or computer monitors. The physical reality of these screens seems to drop away as one becomes more focused on the image(s) they display, and forget about them as objects and instead look at the content that seems to exist behind the screens. A painting is an object, just as a television is, but it is also, at the same time, something immaterial, an image, like a projection on a screen.  It is simultaneously real and false; present and absent. In his work Lynam tries to emphasize elements of the paintings that create this sort of immersive experience -- vivid, glowing color, a sense of internal illumination, and complex layering of marks, patterns, and fragments of images that allude to space behind the physical surface of the work. 

 

Learn more about Phillip Lynam.

February 2014: Linda E. Anderson: Recurrences

Anderson's recent work reveals and erodes imagery through her process, evoking the acts of remembering and forgetting. Surfaces are embedded with histories that may not be immediately apparent, becoming a space where past and present share a permeable non-linear relationship. The work expresses the anxiety associated with transitional states and oppositional qualities, and is a reflection on the instability of identity itself. The fragmentation and repitition or imagery implies both a fixation and elusiveness in the search for a more comforting cohesion and narrative.

December 2013: TINY II

Tiny II will showcase hundreds of original artworks created by more than 80 local artists. Each artwork will be 6”x 6”x 6” or smaller, many for $100 or less. The pieces will move beyond the usual wall space and floor stanchions to occupy all the nooks and crannies of the gallery. Works include paintings, sculptures, drawings, textiles, and more. Some of the work is simply miniature versions of the artist’s standard offerings, but some artists were inspired by the gallery’s layout to create site-specific installations.

Gallery 924 will be closed starting December 24 and will reopen January 2, 2014.

November 2013: Robert Horvath: New is Better

Horvath is primarily known for his high-gloss and refined, large-scale oil paintings that represent our cultural obsession with the appearance of luxury, celebrity, and consumption. In his practice, he begins with an abstract, almost other-worldly sculpture that then serves as inspiration for the resulting highly polished and detailed painting, often mistaken for a digital image. His most recent body of work explores these sculptures with greater depth and detail. Horvath has now escalated his practice of creating a preliminary sculpture by using more substantial materials. Through the use of porcelain, his sculptures have become more permanent and thus represent works in their own right instead of simply a preliminary work or reflection of the grander oil painting. A large collection of his new porcelain sculptures at Gallery 924 have never been seen before outside of his studio.